KTIC Radio Recording, Thursday at 11:17 am – July 31

This is Nathan Mueller, UNL Extension Educator for Cropping Systems, in Fremont, NE. Crop condition ratings and yield predictions have been high for the U.S. Cornbelt. Recently, UNL Faculty and Staff released the 2014 forecasted corn yields based on the Hybrid Maize Model simulations at cropwatch.unl.edu.

The Hybrid-Maize model simulates daily growth and development and final grain yield under both irrigated and dryland conditions. However, this model estimates “yield potential”, thus 2014 factors lowering these yield potentials likely include the lack of uniform emergence, hail damage, and nitrogen deficiency for excessive rain in June. Nevertheless, in the case of dryland corn, the lower daily water use from low daytime temperatures is a leading factor for above-average yield potentials across the Cornbelt. Please visit cropwatch.unl.edu to see the results including Concord in northeast Nebraska and Mead in east-central Nebraska.

My Dodge County Dryland Corn Yield Model explains over 90% of the yield variation year to year from 2005-2013. Parameters include: Daily maximum temperature averaged across July, Cumulative rainfall for June-July-August, and August humidity. With cool daytime highs in July being the largest driver in yield locally.

To keep up on local weekly crop conditions and agronomic issues facing this year’s crop, please read the weekly crop reports from around the state at cropwatch.unl.edu and for Dodge County, my blog at croptechcafe.org. This is Nathan Mueller, UNL Extension Educator for Cropping Systems in Fremont, NE.

KTIC Radio Recording, Thursday at 11:17 am – July 31
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