Dodge County Crop Report – June 23

Figure 1. Dodge County driving route on June 23

Figure 1. Dodge County driving route on June 23

Platte River Valley (Fremont, Ames, North Bend)

The water level in the Fremont Cutoff Ditch (Figure 2) dropped enough after the Friday, June 20 rainfall event to start draining lower-lying fields. However, corn and soybeans on well-drained fields in the Platte River bottom look good with corn reaching the 11-collar growth stage (Figure 3) and soybeans blooming or R1 growth stage (Figure 4). Stunting and yellowing of corn from saturated soils devoid of enough oxygen for root respiration that we are observing will have some season long effects 0n yield potential (Figure 5). However, “Platte Valley Yellows” or iron deficiency chlorosis in soybeans are being amplified by the wet conditions and may be elevated with a drier weather pattern.

Fremont Cutoff Ditch

Figure 2. Fremont Cutoff Ditch

Figure 3. Corn at V11 growth stage in Platte River Valley

Figure 3. Corn at V11 growth stage in Platte River Valley

Figure 4. Soybeans starting to bloom, R1 growth stage

Figure 4. Soybeans starting to bloom, R1 growth stage

Figure 5. Saturated soils stunting corn growth

Figure 5. Saturated soils stunting corn growth

Central Upland Flats and Maple Creek (Located north and south of the Maple Creek along the Webster Rd and Co Road N)

The potholes (Filmore soils) in this region are full as you will likely see them with higher than normal losses of crops (Figure 6). Localized flooding south of the Maple Creek over topped roads, which is uncommon. On the eastern side of the upland flats south of the Maple Creek from Nickerson back west had hail on June the 3rd that reduced plant stands, but not enough to justify replanting. On Friday June 20, another hail event caused some defoliation and stem bruising in both corn and soybeans (Figure 7). The Maple Creek did reach above flood stage on Saturday, June 21, affecting lower lying fields and the community of Nickerson. However, this region has a lot of acres in good condition (Figure 8).

Figure 6. Potholes in the upland flats filled

Figure 6. Potholes in the upland flats filled

Figure 7. Corn hailed on June 3 and June 20.

Figure 7. Corn hailed on June 3 and June 20.

Figure 7. Most corn in the area is looking good.

Figure 8. Most crops in this region look good.

Northwest Rolling Hills/Pebble Creek (Snyder, Dodge)

A bright spot of the county is in the Northwest Rolling Hills along Hwy 79 and 91 near Snyder and Dodge. Corn and soybeans have been mostly missed by severe hail events and excessive water drains away in this area. Luckily, the strong use of no-till production practices in this area has minimized the amount of rill and gully erosion. On August 15, 1.5 miles south of Snyder, UNL and the Nebraska Soybean Board will be hosting a Soybean Management Field Days (Figure 9).

Soybean Management Field Day location south of Snyder

Figure 9. Soybean Management Field Day location south of Snyder

Northeast Rolling Hills/Logan and Clark Creek (Uehling) and North-central Sand Dunes/Cuming Creek

The area hardest hit area by the June 3rd hail storm northwest of the Elkhorn River had some fields that have regrown and filled in better than expected. Replanted corn has reach the V2 growth stage (Figure 10) and soybeans the VC to V1 growth stage. In an area accustom to no-till production, many producers used tillage to get fields into shape to replant. Unfortunately, these areas have seen more erosion from recent rains after ground was smoothed out. The flooding along the Logan Creek caused some replanting efforts to be nullified. Cover crops may become a viable option to keep soils healthy this season for next year’s crop. Flooded soil syndrome can cause yield loss next year and can be mitigated by growing something this season. The sandy uplands north of Scribner will likely benefit from fertigation this season, or N applied through the pivot.

Figure 10. Replanted corn at the V2 growth stage

Figure 10. Replanted corn at the V2 growth stage

Elkhorn River Bottom (Scribner, Hooper, Winslow, Nickerson)

Even though this June has been wet, June 2010 wettest in this region caused significant flooding that has been avoiding so far this season. However, old oxbows and sloughs are filled along with saturated fields in much of the river bottom (Figure 11.). Fields that were replanted are under tough conditions as seedlings cannot tolerate the wet conditions as well. Nitrogen loss from leaching and denitrification is a concern this season.

Figure 11. Waterlogged soils in the Elkhorn River bottom

Figure 11. Waterlogged soils in the Elkhorn River bottom

Agronomic issues for this week

  1. Pivot repair and replacement
  2. Volunteer corn and waterhemp control in soybean fields
  3. Replant considerations for fields were crops drowned out
  4. Nitrogen loss in corn fields

Check in next week for the June 30th crop report for Dodge County.

Dodge County Crop Report – June 23
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