Dodge County Crop Condition Tour – From the Road & Row on July 16

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Figure 1. Major soil associations (colored polygons) in Dodge County are used to segment the crop condition report due to difference in soil texture, drainage, and topography.

In this report, I will use the definitions used by USDA-NASS for crop conditions:

General crop conditions. Categories are defined as follows:

  • Very Poor – Extreme loss of yield potential; complete or near complete crop failure.
  • Poor – Heavy loss of yield potential due to excessive soil moisture, drought, disease, etc.
  • Fair – Less than normal crop conditions. Yield loss is a possibility, but is not severe.
  • Good – Yield prospects are normal or better. Moisture levels are adequate with minimal disease and insect damage.
  • Excellent – Yield prospects are above normal and crops are experiencing little, if any, stress.
Figure 2. Driving route for the July 16, 2015 Dodge County Crop Condition Tour.

Figure 2. Driving route for the July 16, 2015 Dodge County Crop Condition Tour.

Platte River Valley (Fremont, Ames, North Bend)

The corn crop ranged from poor to excellent condition, with most of the crop being in fair-good condition (Figure 3). Last year at this time, more acres were in very poor to poor condition (July 14, 2014 Crop Report). The growth and development of corn ranged from V10 (10 visible collars) on replanted corn to late R1 – silking (corn growth stages) on early planted corn in the Platte River Valley (Figure 4). Over 50% of the corn was pollinating, which is slightly behind last year’s corn maturity in the valley. Seed corn growth and development is also behind last year (Figure 5). Overall, the corn crop is less mature, but in better condition than last year at this time. I noticed less nitrogen deficiency out in the field than expected. Insects found in corn fields were the grape colaspis (Figure 6) and corn blotch leafminer (Figure 7) that cause very minor issues and do not warrant any action. Only low fungal disease pressure from both grey leaf spot and northern corn leaf blight existed.

The soybean crop was also in fair-good condition ranging from poor (Figure 8) to excellent (Figure 9). The soybean growth and development ranged the V3 growth stage to R2 – full bloom (link to soybean growth stages). Last year at this time, some soybean fields were setting pods. Numerous fields were not planted (Figure 10), especially closer to Fremont. Insects found in soybean fields included bean leaf beetles (Figure 11) and grasshoppers. The only noticeable leaf disease was from brown spot.

Figure 3. April-planted irrigated corn (corn-after-corn, conventional till) is in good condition.

Figure 3. April-planted irrigated corn (corn-after-corn, conventional till) is in good condition.

Figure 4. A few fields planted early are almost done pollinating, corn ear had 14 kernel rows by 37 kernels long.

Figure 4. A few fields planted early are almost done pollinating, corn ear had 14 kernel rows by 37 kernels long.

Figure 5. Seed corn growth and development is behind compared to last year.

Figure 5. Seed corn growth and development is behind compared to last year.

grape colaspis

Figure 6. Grape colaspis beetle feeding on corn, but only a very minor issue.

corn blotch leafminer

Figure 7. Corn blotch leafminer damage shouldn’t be confused with foliar diseases.

 

iron deficiency chlorosis

Figure 8. Conventional-tiled soybean field planted late still dealing with saturated soils and iron deficiency chlorosis.

Figure 9. Soybean crop in good condition.

Figure 9. Narrow-row soybean crop in the full bloom stage in good condition.

 

 Prevented planted field in the Platte River valley.

Figure 10. Prevented planted field in the Platte River valley.

bean leaf beetle

Figure 11. Bean leaf beetles are just starting to cause some defoliation along with grasshoppers.

Central Upland Flats and Maple Creek (Located north and south of the Maple Creek along the Webster Rd and Co Road N)

The corn crop ranged from fair to excellent condition, with the irrigated corn crop in good condition and rainfed corn in good-excellent condition due to excellent topsoil and subsoil moisture (Local Crop Water Status). The growth and development of corn ranged from V14 to silking. Less than 50% of the corn was pollinating, which is behind last year’s corn maturity. Seed corn growth and development is also behind last year. Insects in found in corn fields were northern corn rootworm beetles (Figure 12), brown stink bugs (Figure 13), grape colaspis, and corn blotch leafminer. Only low fungal disease pressure from gray leaf spot, common rust, and northern corn leaf blight (Figure 14) existed.

The soybean crop was in fair to excellent condition, most soybeans in good condition. The soybean growth and development ranged from beginning (R1) to full bloom (R2). Last year at this time, some soybean fields were setting pods. Insects found in soybean fields included the alfalfa caterpillar (Figure 15), green cloverworm, stink bug (Figure 16), and grasshopper species. The only disease found was brown spot.

Sorghum on corners of seed corn production fields were in growth stage 4 and there was some symptoms from a fungal leaf disease (Figure 17). Overall, more acres have the potential to be harvested due less ponding in potholes compared to a year ago in central upland flats.

northern corn rootworm

Figure 12. Northern corn rootworm beetles found an irrigated no-till corn-after-bean field.

stink bug

Figure 13. Corn leaf damage caused by stink bug earlier this season showing up now.

Northern corn leaf blight

Figure 14. Northern corn leaf blight in an irrigated corn field. Previous crop was soybeans

velvetbean caterpillar

Figure 15. Alfalfa caterpillar eating soybean leaves

 

Stink bug eggs on a soybean leaf.

Figure 16. Stink bug eggs on a soybean leaf.

grain sorghum

Figure 17. Grain sorghum on corners of irrigated seed corn.

Elkhorn River Bottom (Scribner, Hooper, Winslow, & Nickerson)

Similar to the Platte River Valley, some fields did not get planted. The corn crop ranged from poor to good condition, most in fair-good condition. The growth and development of corn ranged from V10 to silking. However, some continuous corn fields looked a lot better than last year and not showing as much nitrogen deficiency. The soybean crop was in poor to good condition, most soybeans in fair condition.  Soybean growth ranged V4 plants just starting to slower that were planted late to soybeans plants in full bloom (R2). Wet conditions and late planting in some soybean fields will limit yield potential (Figure 18).

wet conditions

Figure 18. Late planting and wet conditions linger in some field in the Elkhorn river bottom.

Northwest Rolling Hills/Pebble Creek (Snyder & Dodge)

The corn crop ranged from good to excellent condition, with the irrigated corn crop in good condition and rainfed corn in good-excellent condition due to excellent topsoil and subsoil moisture. The growth and development of corn ranged from V14 to silking.  No significant insect or disease issues (Figure 19) were observed in the corn fields we looked at.

The soybean crop was in fair to excellent condition, most soybeans in good-excellent condition (Figure 20). The soybean growth ranged beginning (R1) to full bloom (R2). Some bacterial blight (Figure 21) was found in this region, but warmer weather will slow this disease down significantly.

Figure z. This rainfed corn field following soybeans had very little foliar diseases in the northwest rolling hills.

Figure 19. Rainfed corn field following soybeans had very little foliar diseases

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Figure 20. Irrigated soybean field at the R2 growth stage, 30+ inches tall and in good condition.

bacterial blight

Figure 21. Bacterial blight on observed in the Northwest Hills near Snyder.

North-Central Sand Dunes/Cuming Creek (North of Scribner)

The high frequency of rainfall and less nitrogen deficiency issues this year has put the corn in good to excellent condition for this area (Figure 22). The soybean crop ranged from fair to good condition. Defoliation from grasshoppers was more of an issue in this part of the county on field borders (Figure 23).

silking

Figure 22. Irrigated corn in good to excellent condition this year on sandy soils in north-central Dodge County

grasshoppers

Figure 23. Defoliation of corn leaves from grasshoppers on field borders.

Northeast Rolling Hills/Logan and Clark Creek (Uehling)

The corn crop ranged from good-excellent condition. The growth and development of corn ranged from V14 to silking as it has in other regions. Only low fungal disease pressure from gray leaf spot, common rust (Figure 24), and northern corn leaf blight existed. The soybean crop was in fair to excellent condition, most soybeans in good condition (Figure 25). The soybean growth and development ranged beginning (R1) to full bloom (R2). Several oat fields looked to be in good condition and will be harvested soon (Figure 26).

Common rust

Figure 24. Common rust pustules found at higher amounts in this field in northeast Dodge County.

Soybeans

Figure 25. Soybeans at full bloom. 30″ tall and in excellent condition.

oats

Figure 26. Oat field will be harvested soon.

 

How did conditions compare to last year: Dodge County Crop Tour – July 14, 2014

Agronomic matters for this next week

  1. Scout corn for leaf fungal diseases to assess need for fungicide applications. Contact your seed rep to make a list of which hybrids are more susceptible and may benefit most for foliar fungicides.
  2. Monitor or assess soil moisture prior to irrigation with soil probe or read soil moisture sensors – See to new page with local crop water status

 

Dodge County Crop Condition Tour – From the Road & Row on July 16
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2 thoughts on “Dodge County Crop Condition Tour – From the Road & Row on July 16

  1. Mike Dvorak says:

    Nathan,
    I am very impressed with the near real time posts and pictures identifying various crop pests and diseases.

    • Thanks for the comment. I have received good feedback from farmers that all my pictures help them when they go to look in their fields and when to look for things.

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